Church of the Holy Sepulchre 1/15-16/2018

The Church of the Holy Sepulchre[b] (Arabic: كَنِيسَةُ ٱلْقِيَامَة‎ Kaneesatu al-Qeyaamah; Greek: Ναός της Αναστάσεως Naos tes Anastaseos; Armenian: Սուրբ Հարության տաճար Surb Harut’yan tač̣ar; Latin: Ecclesia Sancti Sepulchri;[c] also called the Church of the Resurrection or Church of the Anastasis by Orthodox Christians) is a church in the Christian Quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem, a few steps away from the Muristan. The church contains, according to traditions dating back to at least the fourth century, the two holiest sites in Christianity: the site where Jesus of Nazareth was crucified,[1] at a place known as “Calvary” or “Golgotha”, and Jesus’s empty tomb, where he is said to have been buried and resurrected.[2] The tomb is enclosed by the 18th-century shrine, called the Aedicule (Edicule). The Status Quo, a 150-year old understanding between religious communities, applies to the site.[3][4] The famed immovable ladder remains on the top-right balcony of the shrine.

Within the church proper are the last four (or, by some definitions, five) Stations of the Via Dolorosa, representing the final episodes of Jesus’ Passion. The church has been a major Christian pilgrimage destination since its creation in the fourth century, as the traditional site of the Resurrection of Christ, thus its original Greek name, Church of the Anastasis.

Today, the wider complex accumulated during the centuries around the Church of the Holy Sepulchre also serves as the headquarters of the Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem, while control of the church itself is shared between several Christian denominations and secular entities in complicated arrangements essentially unchanged for over 160 years, and some for much longer. The main denominations sharing property over parts of the church are the Greek Orthodox, Armenian Apostolic and Roman Catholic, and to a lesser degree the Coptic Orthodox, Syriac Orthodox and Ethiopian Tewahedo. Meanwhile, Protestants, including Anglicans, have no permanent presence in the Church. Some Protestants prefer The Garden Tomb, elsewhere in Jerusalem, as a more evocative site to commemorate Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection.

The Reverend Marcus G. Halley

Episcopal. Millennial. Queer. Black.

Derek Maul: Monday, Wednesday, & Friday

faith-based commentary for people who think

The Millennial Pastor

An iPhone Pastor for a Typewriter Church

WIT

Women in Theology

The Fellow Christian

Cultural Thoughts from a Biblical Worldview

GALA MAGAZINE | LGBT ARTISTS

Life is a Festival ... Come Out & Play!

An Artist Residing in a Pastor's Body

one pastor's creative journey

The Daily Office

Not Just a Website, a Community

Thoughts Prayers and Art

A reflective Journey through Christian Living

The Daily Post

The Art and Craft of Blogging

The WordPress.com Blog

The latest news on WordPress.com and the WordPress community.

%d bloggers like this: